Rhian Ivory
Rhian Ivory

All About Rhian Ivory

Rhian was born in Swansea but moved to the Brecon Beacons where she went to school until 11. She then moved all the way across the border to Hereford. She returned to Wales to study English Literature at Aberystwyth and trained as a Drama and English teacher and wrote her first novel during her first few years in teaching.

She got her first publishing deal at 26 (found on the slush pile) and went on to write three more novels for Bloomsbury. She took a break to have three children and during this time taught Creative Writing and also a Children’s Literature course for the Open University.

Rhian has been working with students with Autism with her therapy dog, Betty which has been fascinating and something she is happy to offer as an option. She is currently training a Medical Detection Dog who can, if the schools are interested, also accompany her on school visits.

Rhian has been a Patron of Reading at Akeley Wood School for 3 years and is now a Patron of Reading at Bordesley Green Girls School.

Rhian is a National Trust Writer in Residence and has most recently worked with Sudbury Hall and the Museum of Childhood.

Rhian’s School Visits

Option 1

How I came to be an author talk, reading, Q&A followed by a signing – 1 hr. This can be in an assembly hall to several classes or whole year groups.

 

Option 2

Creative writing workshop based around Special Gift/Skill/Talent workshop using The Boy who drew the Future, teaching basic creative writing skills which are transferable and generic. This works well as a whole day session but can also be delivered as a morning session to 1 group and an afternoon session to another group.

 

Option 3

Historical workshop using source material, The Boy who drew the Future (which has a timeline set in 1865) and The Workhouse. Covers how to use pictures and Victorian heirlooms as a stimulus in creative writing and addresses the difference between writing in the past and the present.

 

Option 4

Fairy tale retelling workshop using Matchgirl: How to take a fairy tale and make it contemporary and unique using dramatic storytelling techniques and character work.

 

Option 5

Poetry and song writing workshop using music and Hope as stimulus.
Covers basic poetry techniques. Suitable for beginners and upwards. Can be tailored to GCSE or A-Level syllabus or other curriculum needs.

 

Option 6

Bespoke Creative writing workshop tailored to your curriculum needs or Ofsted focus using your syllabus or preferred topic. Most popular request is for GCSE and A-Level focus on creative writing component of the exam and coursework.

 

Option 7
Hope workshops:
PSHE – Hope deals with grief, PMDD (Pre-Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder), mental health, social media & the problems it can cause between friends, diabetes & burns victims (through the hospital setting at Birmingham Children’s). A Hope workshop can focus on all or specific themes.

WRITING:
Using the Hope Spotify playlist this creative writing workshop looks at music, lyrics and the impact singing, song writing and the sharing of music has on teenagers.
There are two songs in the novel which Hope has written and are set to music by Tracy Chapman and The Bangles, using these as examples students will write their own lyrics set to music of their choice, with a strong narrative at their heart.
 INSET

Rhian is available for inset training on how to use creative writing techniques and skills in English, Drama and cross curricular subjects.

 

Rhian’s Books

The Boy who Drew the Future

The Boy who Drew the Future

Fifteen-year-old Blaze and Noah live in the same village, Sible Hedingham, more than 100 years apart. They both have the same gift or curse – they find they must draw pictures that later come true. In the 1860s Blaze is bullied, cheated and accused of being a witch and ‘swam’. In the present day, Noah is used to everyone, even his parents, being afraid of him and is desperate to keep his drawing a secret. But as he gets closer to Beth, he must decide whether or not he can tell her the truth. Can Blaze’s history help Noah and Beth work out their own story? Can the future be changed?

When Isla Meets Luke Meets Isla

When Isla meets luke meets Isla

‘I didna want to leave really. I wanted to push the red emergency button like they have on trains to stop and you have to pay a fifty pound fine if you didna mean it. I wanted to make the pilot turn the plane around. I wanted to go back to ma school. I didn’t even know what Maidstone looked like. It sounded grey. Grey, dull and dreary. No music, no Castle, no Firth of Forth, no Lucy, no Helen, no Saturdays into Princes Street on the bus for GBP1, we get on for half I folded ma arms, arranging ma face into a permanent sulk with a clear ‘No Entry’ sign on it.’ Isla moves down with her parents from Scotland to England and instantly feels herself in an alien land. But then she meets Luke and slowly their friendship blossoms into love. Each chapter reveals the alternate viewpoints of Isla and Luke – Isla the motormouth, Luke more measured. With the potential to appeal to both boys and girls, this is a brilliant first novel from a very talented author, also a teacher, who was discovered on the ‘slush’ pile.

Isle and Luke: Make or Break?

Isla and Luke

A brilliantly effervescent sequel to “When Isla Meets Luke Meets Isla”, where Isla and Luke, having started their relationship, find that the path of true love rarely runs smooth. What are you supposed to do when you love somebody but you find that you have different plans for the future? And then Isla does something to Luke that anybody would find hard to forgive. Will Luke forgive Isla? Can Isla do anything to make it right again? The narrative, written in alternative viewpoints from Isla and Luke, and in a brilliantly readable stream-of-consciousness style, totally captures the voice of today’s teenager.

True Colours

True Colours

Rosie’s mum has a thing against fairgrounds, so when she agrees to take Rosie to the fair on the last day of their holiday, Rosie is shocked. But far greater surprises are in store. A visit to an odd little tent housing Florien’s Fates and Fortunes opens a Pandora’s box of mysteries – all of which Rosie is determined to solve. Firstly, how is it she can now see colours above people’s heads, and what do those colours tell her about them? Intrigued, Rosie decides to research and develop her new aura-reading skills by practising them at school, on her friends and at home. It is her mum, she discovers, who is keeping the biggest secret of all. Could it have something to do with the father she’s never known and whom her mum refuses to speak about? Rosie will need to resolve her friendship issues if she is going to get the help she needs to piece together the mystery.

The Bad Girls’ Club

The Bad Girls' Club

Four girls – Mary, Bea, Meena and Atlanta – are thrown together when they are picked for very different reasons by their teacher, to form a book review club. Their discussions and reviews will be heard on radio, chaired and presented by the incredibly cool Jazz. As the girls gradually relax and talk more and more animatedly about what they think about the different books, they find they are learning from, as well as about, each other. And so they become friends…Until one day Mary does the unforgivable and, having flirted outrageously with Bea’s new boyfriend, makes an all-out play for him. The tender new friendship of the foursome is fractured as a result of what Mary has done. Narrated by the different characters in turn, this is fresh, contemporary and compulsive writing that every teenager will identify with, charting the insecurities and the tests of friendship that are part of growing up the world over.

 

Hope

It’s the summer between school and sixth-form. When Hope doesn’t get into drama college and her friends do, all her plans fall apart. She’s struggling with anger, grief for her father and a sense that her own body is against her. A chance meeting on a ferry gives her someone to talk to. But is she brave enough to ask for help? Can she find her plan B?

‘Real characters to root for, laugh with, cry for, and a subject that should be more widely shared.’

Joanna Nadin

‘A beautifully told story. Hope is a beautifully written book about grief, self-doubt, courage and hope. It made me cry. It also made me download the clue app. An excellent read!’

Liz Corr, author of The Witch’s Kiss

‘Brilliant! Touching & truthfulA really full, impressive book, a really full, impressive book.’A really full, impressive book

Tracy Rees, Richard & Judy Search for a Bestseller winner

Recommendations & Reviews

“It was fantastic to hear Rhian talk to the whole school about the process of writing a novel and explaining where she gets her inspiration. I’m positive that the skills learned in the creative writing workshops will benefit the Year 10 students in their GCSE examinations next year, especially with the new emphasis on imaginative writing. The whole school was buzzing to get advice from a real author and everyone was talking about how fun the workshops were afterwards. I would wholeheartedly recommend Rhian if you want to inspire some enthusiasm for reading and writing in your school.” – Miss Georgina Pearson, Head of English and Performing Art, Quinton House School

“Whether you invite Rhian to simply read to your students and answer their questions or whether you just hand them over to be taken through imaginative and creative writing workshops, you and they will be delighted. Rhian communicates clearly and effectively with students of different ages, and draws out their enthusiasms and abilities. The students love the workshops, and I love the way they contribute to a lasting engagement with both writing and reading.” – Jonathan Cook, Head of English, Akeley Wood School

THE BOY WHO DREW THE FUTURE (FIREFLY)
Two boys are linked by parallel stories in this atmospheric thriller from Rhian Ivory. Blaze and Noah are both 15 and both live in the same village, Sible Hedingham. Both have the same ability, to draw the future. Is it a gift or a curse? What makes the story so absorbing is that Noah is a modern teenager while Blaze is a boy accused of witchcraft in the 1860s. I liked the historical feel to the Blaze chapters, and Noah is an engaging character, especially with his insecurities over a blossoming romance with Beth. Secrets start to emerge as danger grows and Ivory keeps the tension high in this taut novel. MC

THE BOY WHO DREW THE FUTURE (FIREFLY)
Two boys are linked by parallel stories in this atmospheric thriller from Rhian Ivory. Blaze and Noah are both 15 and both live in the same village, Sible Hedingham. Both have the same ability, to draw the future. Is it a gift or a curse? What makes the story so absorbing is that Noah is a modern teenager while Blaze is a boy accused of witchcraft in the 1860s. I liked the historical feel to the Blaze chapters, and Noah is an engaging character, especially with his insecurities over a blossoming romance with Beth. Secrets start to emerge as danger grows and Ivory keeps the tension high in this taut novel. MC

Awards and Nominations

Nominated for the Carnegie Gold Medal 2017

Shortlisted for the Calderdale Book of the Year

Shortlisted for the Cumbrian Book of the Year

Shortlisted for the Shropshire Book of the Year – Runner Up

Shortlisted for the Wirral Book of the Year

To Make a Booking

To make an enquiry about Rhian, or any of the other authors, poets & illustrators listed on this website, please phone Trevor Wilson on +44 (0) 1535 656015, or email him at trevor@caboodlebooks.co.uk